Add Flavor to Your Playing With These 14 Guitar Chords

Whether you’re a fan of jazz or not, these jazz guitar chords can add a whole new level of richness to your musical repertoire. Guitar teacher Jerry W shares the seven types of chords you’ll need to know…

Are you tired of playing only the major chords or playing the occasional minor chords? Want to add more flavor to your playing by adding some jazz guitar chords. excellent! Let me introduce you to 14 common jazz chords that you can start using in your music.

If I were to show you all the possible chord diagrams for all seven chords, it would be more than this post could cover. So what I’m going to do is show you the most common open positions for these 14 types of strings and how you can use them.

What are the guitar strings used in jazz?

jazz guitar chords

Although you can use a variety of ropes when play jazz guitarThere are few songs that stand out in songs more than others. These include:

  • Major 7 Chord
  • add 9 chords
  • Major 9 Chord
  • Major 6 Chord
  • Minor seventh chord
  • 9 Chord 9 Minor
  • dominant 9 chord

Here’s a video that explains more guitar chord basics for all styles of music:

What makes a chord a jazz chord?

jazz guitar chords

Jazz guitar is a style of guitar playing that uses jazz chords and jazz progressions. Tempo changes may refer to jazz style as well.

Most, but not all, jazz chords have been added to the seven chords. For example, if you’re playing a G chord, it might turn into a G7 chord for jazz guitar.

the guitar chord jazz melody Mastering the players can be a bit tricky, but the right guidance can make all the difference.

We’ll walk you through everything you need to know in this post, but the best way to get personalized advice as you learn how to playing jazz guitar It is to get the help of an experienced expert.Sign up online and live guitar lessons here!

What chords are mostly used in jazz? 7 best jazz chords to learn

jazz guitar chords

these Advanced jazz guitar chords It will help you get the most out of any jazz song do you want to play.

1. The Major 7 Chord (maj7)

The major 7 chord can be used to replace the I chord or the IV chord in major keys. As a quick reminder of the theory, the chord number refers to the tone of the scale on which the chord is built. For example, the chords C and F are in the key of C. (They are 1St and 4y Notes on a large scale in C major scale.) Here are six open-position major chords you can play.

7 major guitar chords open position

Here’s the I-IV-IVI chord sequence in a few keys to show you how it works:

C key: Cmaj7 – Fmaj7 – Cmaj7 – G7 – Cmaj7
G key: Gmaj7 – Cmaj7 – Gmaj7 – D7 – Gmaj7
D: Dmaj7 – Gmaj7 – Dmaj7 – A7 – Dmaj7
Key A: Amaj7 – Dmaj7 – Amaj7 – E7 – Amaj7
Note that the V chord is the dominant 7 chord, not maj7 (i.e. G7, not Gmaj7.)

2. Add 9 chord (Add 9)

The additional 9 chord, like the major 6 chord, can be used to replace most major chords. Here are some examples of the open position adding 9 strings.

Open the center Add 9 guitar strings

The D chord in this example is actually a D2 chord because it’s missing the 3research and development of the tendon, but it can work the same way. Here is the progression of the I-IV-VI chord in a few keys to show you how it works.

C key: C (add9) – F (add9) – G (add9) – C (add9)
G key: G (Add 9) – C (Add 9) – D7 – G (Add 9)
D: D2 – G (Add 9) – A (Add 9) – D2
A key: A (add9) – D2 – E (add9) – A (add9)

3. The Major 9 Chord (maj9)

The major 9 chord is almost identical to the supplementary 9 chord except that we have both 7 . chordsy and 9y in the tendon. Here are some examples of the 9-string major open position.

9 major guitar chords open position

Here is the progression of the I-IV-VI chord in a few keys to show you how it works. I’ve mixed 7 and 9 major chords so you can practice both.

C key: Cmaj9 – Fmaj7 – G (add9) – Cmaj9
G key: Gmaj9 – Cmaj7 – D2 – Gmaj9
D: Dmaj9 – Gmaj7 – A (add9) – Dmaj9
Key A: Amaj9 – Dmaj7 – E (add9) – Amaj9

4. The Major 6 Chord (6)

The 6-major chord can be used to replace almost any major chord. Here are the six major chords for the most common open position.

Major guitar chords 6 open position

Here is the I-IV-VI chord sequence in a few keys to illustrate how it works:

C key: C6 – F6 – G6 – C6
G switch: G6 – C6 – D6 – G6
D: D6 – G6 – A6 – D6
A key: A6 – D6 – E6 – A6

You may want to compare this to the sound of the same progression using the 9 major chords above. Also, if you replace the V chord with another V7, you will find that the advance has a stronger pull on the I.

5. The Minor 7 Chord (M7)

The mini 7 chord can be used to replace most minor strings. As an added advantage, the minor 7 built from the second chord can also be used to replace the fourth chord. Here are five small chords for open positions of 7 chords.

Small open center guitar strings 7

Here is the progression of the vi-ii-VI chord in a few keys to show you how it works:

C key: Am7 – Dm7 – G7 – Cmaj7
G key: Em7 – Am7 – D7 – Gmaj7
D: Bm7 – Em7 – A7 – Dmaj7
Key A: F # m7 – Bm7 – E7 – Amaj7

6. The Minor 9 Chord (M9)

The minor 9 chord can be used to replace the second chord or the sixth chord in major keys. Here are some examples of the 9-string open position.

Open position micro 9 guitar strings

Note: Dm (add9) is not a valid 9th minor chord because it is missing 3research and development It is more stringy and therefore less repulsive, but it will work the same way. Here is the progression of the vi-ii-VI chord in a few keys to show you how it works:

C key: Am9 – Dm (add9) – G7 – Cmaj9
G key: Em9 – Am9 – D7 – Gmaj9
D: Bm9 – Em9 – A7 – Dmaj9
A key: F # m7 – Bm9 – E7 – Amaj9

7. The Dominant 9 Chord (V9)

The dominant 9 chord can be used to replace the V chord. Here are some examples of the open center dominant 9 chord.

Open dominant position 9 guitar strings

Here is the progression of the vi-ii-VI chord in a few keys to show you how it works:

C key: Am9 – Dm (add9) – G9 – Cmaj9
G key: Em9 – Am9 – D9 – Gmaj9
D: Bm9 – Em9 – A9 – Dmaj9
A key: F # m7 – Bm9 – E9 – Amaj9

7 more jazz guitar chords

jazz guitar chords

There are plenty of other jazz chords you can learn as well.

Jazz guitar chords are divided into four tones (usually root, third, fifth, and seventh) and can be categorized into several types.

Some other examples include:

  • Dominant 7 (1 – 3 – 5 – b 7)
  • m7b5 (half diminished) (1 – b3 – b5 – b7)
  • Decreased 7 (1 – b3 – b5 – bb7)
  • Enhanced Major 7 (1-3 – #5-7)
  • Dominant 7 Intense (1-3 – #5 – B7)
  • Minor 7 (1 – B 3 – 5 – 7)
  • 7sus4 (1 – 4 – 5 – b7)

start with Jazz guitar lessons Today to learn all these fun ropes – and then some!

Easy jazz guitar chords for any player

jazz guitar chords

I hope this introduction serves in some common open positions jazz guitar chords Spark your interest in the beauty and versatility of these ropes. With your capo, you can take these chords and extend them to any key. Or you may want to study the moving versions of each of these strings so you can use them in higher positions on the guitar.

It may help to have a look at the file jazz guitar chords Graph as you learn how to play this jazz guitar chord Players everywhere should know, too. here Useful example.

Keep practicing and you’ll have mastered a whole new world of chords, sounds and patterns – and you’ll be awesome jazz player boot!

Are you looking for individual instructions? Whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced guitarist, there is always more to learn, and a great teacher can help guide you to the next level in playing. Find a guitar teacher today!

Jerry

Jerry W. teaches classical guitar, composition, trombone, and trumpet in Grosse Pointe, Michigan. He holds a BA in Music Theory and Composition from Cornerstone University and MA and Ph.D. degrees in Music Composition from Michigan State University. Jerry has been composing music and teaching students for over thirty years. Learn more about Jerry W. here!

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Photography by Tom Marcelo

Megan L.

Megan L. Writer and musician living in San Diego. She loves supporting independent artists and learning more about music every day. Megan has been at TakeLessons since November 2011. Google+

Megan L.

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